Changing Our Mindset

Mindset…Teacher, or facilitator?

principalaim

Change in Mindset

What role do we play in making sure we can appropriately support the learning process for our students? We have to first change our mindset becoming the facilitator in the learning process instead of always being the driver. tlb

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Education evaluation

Education evaluation

Even though I do think it’s important to see how countries are doing in their respective jobs of Education, I agree with paragraph 5 whole heartedly.  Creating an educational evaluation system that has grades as only ONE aspect, and not the entire aspect is a wonderful idea.  Although it’s not exactly a novel idea, but an essential one that I think needs to be pursued more.

Drive. We Need Motivation.

Drive, what motivates us?

Teaching. Learning. Thinking.

Note: This is the first post in a series on professional books I’ve committed myself to read over the course of the year. Twelve books–one for each month of the year–that’s my goal. This post is a short account of my impressions of the book, from an educator’s perspective.

Book # 1:  Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us by Daniel H. Pink.

DriveI can’t recommend this book enough. Does increased motivation sound good to you? I read this book this past January, but the topic is even more relevant now that we’re at the end of another academic year, a time educators are searching for any motivation that’s still left in them. My first exposure to the book was by means of RSA’s entertaining animation of Pink’s work. This short video addresses the main ideas covered in the book. If you haven’t seen it yet, you should…

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The Question, Waiting to be Answered

Creativity and asking questions

Actualization

The crux of the pivotal paradigm shift to which we constantly refer comes down to this: questions, not answers. Once you make the shift to this new pedagogy, everything else will shift with you. And once you start asking questions, those around you will feel the ripple effect and begin asking too. We may not see where those ripples end, but we will have helped make the shift simply in how we look at and discuss education. If your reference point is still within four walls, break them down by asking what you can find beyond. There is no more “outside the box.” Standardization, identifying acceptable answers, is dead. Innovation, seeking new answers, is the new norm.

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What great schools do.

Why do you do what you do?

@mrocallaghan_edu

A few weeks ago I read an article on the BBC website written by Mike Henson entitled – ‘Inside the cult of Saracens.’ The article explores how the English rugby team Saracens has built a culture of togetherness that has enabled the team to perform better on the pitch. If you haven’t read the article please spend five minutes reading now!

After reading the article one section struck me as an excellent vision statement for what successful schools do. If you replaced ‘Saracens’ with the name of your school you have an extremely powerful statement of intent…

What successful schools do - taken from http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/rugby-union/27536258 What successful schools do – taken from http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/rugby-union/27536258

From reading the above statement you would never be in any doubt of the WHY behind Saracens. They know WHAT they do and HOW to go about doing it. What gives them an edge over their opponents is an extremely clear sense of WHY they do what…

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Motivation and emotion

Joe Kirby's blog

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What makes kids motivated? And how can teachers and senior leaders get all kids working hard? In a five-post series, I’m exploring a few different ways of thinking about these questions. Last week, I borrowed from game theory and behavioural economics to illuminate motivation deficits and short attention spans. This week, I want to look at expectancy, emotions and trust.

Self-fulfilling prophecies

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According to ancient Greek legend, Pygamalion invested so much love and care in sculpting a statue of the most beautiful and inspiring woman he could imagine, that the gods fulfilled his hopes and metamorphosed her into reality.

Teachers’ expectations have an impact on pupils that is hard to overstate. In 1968, Rosenthal & Jacobson ran a landmark experiment. When teachers were told that top sets were actually bottom sets, results declined. When teachers were told bottom sets were actually top set, results improved.

This has been replicated…

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