Getting back up

Getting back up

Advertisements

Motivation and instruction

Motivation why we do or don’t have it!

Pragmatic Education

lazysquirrel

Why do some kids arrive at secondary school already motivated to work hard, while some arrive demotivated to exert much effort at all in lessons?

Picture two students you’ve taught: one who works incredibly hard, and one who seems incredibly lacklustre and avoids making effort. What explains this difference? How does motivation work?

In a series of five blogposts, I plan to explore what we as teachers can do about motivation, self-control and willpower in school. There’ll be stories of elephants, chimps and bees; mindsets, biases and self-fulfilling prophecies. The heroes of the story will be Carol Dwek, Daniel Kahnemann, Richard Thaler & Cass Sunstein, Jonathan Haidt, Kelly McGonigal and the Heath brothers. Going beyond the cognitive psychology I’ve been exploring, this is a journey into our social, intuitive minds.

In the first post of the series, I want to see how two approaches from the field of economics might apply…

View original post 1,282 more words

Standards May Achieve Equality, But Not Equity

Equality vs Equity…

radical eyes for equity

Michelle Morrissey makes a case for Common Core in By ‘Common,’ We Mean Equity:

When the Common Core State Standards emerged, it was both a shock and a revelation — for the first time, the dominant model said that my students, who live in low-income neighborhoods and are predominately Hispanic or African American, would have some guarantee of the same kinds of educational experiences that students at high-performing schools across the country have. All students would be asked to do the hard stuff—and reap the benefits of those high expectations.

Setting aside the inaccurate hyperbole (“for the first time”) and that every single round of standards embraced in the U.S. since the 1890s has come with the exact same set of claims (and then has always failed, thus a new round of “better” standards), the fundamental problem with chasing better standards is that standards may achieve equality, but not…

View original post 336 more words

Gratitude

Reflections

give-thanks1 This time of year I tend to think a lot about gratitude. I’m grateful for Alethea’s help this year. I’m thankful to all of the individuals and teams that allow us to do our good work. I’m grateful for Christine and her cafeteria team for keeping us well fed and happy with cookies during long meetings. I’m thankful for Barbara’s hard work. I’m thankful for Elizabeth who cleans my office each evening. I’m grateful for all of the acts of kindness.

Barbara Fredrickson, a psychology professor at the University of North Carolina, has studied the effect of positive feelings, including gratitude. Research tells us that cultivating gratitude can actually undo the effects of negative emotions, such as anger and anxiety. Her team has also found that feeling grateful can broaden our thinking, which in turn builds optimism. They have found that gratitude can broaden people’s mindsets and inspire future…

View original post 188 more words

Vision Meeting – Growth Mindset

Mindset again, amazing how it affects so much!

Class Teaching

gmdhs Today I led the second of our new breakfast ‘vision meetings’ – looking at how we can continue to embed a growth mindset across the school.  These are voluntary meetings where members of our leadership team share their vision, for an aspect of work that they are responsible for, with a group of interested staff, who then give their input into how to best implement the vision.  We’ve already done a great deal in terms of mindset and sharing excellence  across the school – but we want to do more.  So following a discussion on what we’ve achieved so far, based on the ideas from the three great books below, staff at the meeting were asked to think about how else we could develop this further.

3greatbooks

As usual, when you put a group of school staff into a room together, they come up with some great ideas.  They are listed below under the…

View original post 906 more words

Beliefs, Fromage Frais & The Pygmalion Effect

high expectations?

Class Teaching

DHS drama teacher and occasional guest blogger Lesley Graney is back, thinking about beliefs, fromage frais and The Pygmalion Effect.  Read on……

yoghurt2

What do beliefs, fromage frais and the Pygmalion Effect have in common? Where is she going with this?  Well…..I read a blog and watched a clip on ‘The Pygmalion Effect’ on the same week that my beliefs were shattered about a certain brand of … fromage frais.

This week I may have found out that I could have been a bad mother due to my beliefs!  I have been giving my children this certain brand of fromage frais, REGUARLY!!  Like every day, regularly.

Well, ‘What’s wrong with that?’, I hear you ask, surely you are saying, ‘it’s a healthy, fruit based yogurt providing one of your children’s 5 day; you should be applauded.’

No, it’s not.  My belief was shattered this week as I read in a national…

View original post 359 more words